Dating methods history


You may associate all ancient mummies with the Egyptians, but the earliest evidence of embalming was actually found in the remains of the Chinchorro peoples, who resided in what is now modern-day Chile . Unlike the Egyptians, who mummified on the basis of class, the Chinchorro exhibited an egalitarian method of preserving the dead. What’s even more interesting is that though they were mummifying 2,000 years before the Egyptians were, their methods were more advanced. The Chinchorro approach to mummification was lengthy. First a body was relieved of its skin, flesh, organs, and brain. The bones, now exposed, were then taken apart and burnt with hot ash so as to remove any liquid that would allow for decay. They were then reassembled with twigs for support. The newly formed bone-twig skeleton was bound tightly with reeds, and then the skin was reapplied to the body—supplemented with the skin of sea lions or pelicans as required. An ash paste was then painted over the body to ensure stability, and the face was covered in a clay mask. The finishing touch involved either black or ocher paint, which was applied to the entirety of the newly mummified body, most likely for reasons of conformity and equality.

Flaking was one of the first uses of technology. Technologies are tools and also skills that make our lives easier. Flaking is an example of a Stone Age technology skill. Flaking involves using a hammer stone to form sharp edges on an object stone by striking it on its sides. By flaking early humans could sharpen spear and arrow tips to hunt prey.


Dating methods history

Dating methods history